Category Archives: Brunswick History

Sharing the stories of those who came before us, because history, like politics, is personal!

Turning a Deaf Ear: Brunswick Before the First Battle of Louisburg

  In 1735, after nearly two decades of living amongst one another, English and Ulster Scot settlers of Brunswick petitioned the legislature to incorporate their town. Document signers included Ulster Scot blacksmith Andrew Dunning and his sons David and James, … Continue reading

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In One Ear: Before the First Battle of Louisbourg

Wars that originated in Europe invariably stormed across the Atlantic to the New World. At the end of each conflict, colonists in the Americas found themselves subject to the terms of a new treaty. These agreements were hammered out by … Continue reading

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Pompey’s Circumstance

The previous blogs, “Twice on Sunday 1 & 2,” described a fictional day in the life of the commander of Fort George, Capt. Benjamin Larrabee. Everyone Larrabee interacted with in the story was real, including his “Negro servant” Pompey. What … Continue reading

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Twice on Sunday: Part 2

  The settlers continued their long sit on the hard wooden benches, inside the First Parish Meeting House. Some of them sat stiffly upright, others, particularly the youngest, wiggled and squirmed. The sun beat down on the building, and thus … Continue reading

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TWICE ON SUNDAY: PART 1

TWO BOOKS by Brunswick authors inspired me to take a different for this particular blog. The first book, The Eastern by Deborah Gould, is a fictionalized account of five real families who settled along the Eastern River in Pittston in … Continue reading

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Competent Inhabitants

  Brunswick was the place to be in the 1730s. Ulster Scots named Giveen, Malcolm, Simpson, Stanwood, and Campbell joined early settlers Woodside, Dunning, and McFarland. The Gatchells arrived, claiming Welch ancestry. Old guard English families like Hinkley, Minot, and … Continue reading

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The French Connection

The 1730s brought new families to the Pejepscot area. Two of these were the Larrabees and Coombs, who settled just northeast of Harpswell in that part of Brunswick called New Meadows. Some Larrabees had left Massachusetts for southern Maine in … Continue reading

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